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Infographic: Signs you shouldn’t accept that job

We like the idea of people finding jobs. We prefer the idea of people getting jobs and we positively adore people staying in a job they love. Let’s face it, that’s what we do.

Every day thousands of Candidates find and apply for vacancies and secure employment via the jobs here at My Job Hub and we like to remind our Candidates that the interview is a two way process, it isn’t just an opportunity for the employer to size you up..you’ve gotta like them too!

Check out today’s fantastic infographic, courtesy of our friends over at ApprovedIndex:

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Recruitment & HR: Leaving the EU

We’re not about to descend into political discussion. Over here at My Job Hub we try to sit firmly on the fence of politics and basque in our neutral territory. One topic that we thought may be pertinent to raise, what with the looming Referendum this June, is the European Union and it’s impact on laws affecting UK HR and Recruitment.

One thing that we do know is that Britain hasn’t struggled to make laws, in fact, in many instances we have led the way with the quality of Acts and Legislation that have protected our workers and improved the workplace over the last century. Thanks to the harsh working conditions of the Industrial Revolution and the changes in gender balance following the Second World War, Britain was forced to implement drastic legislation affecting the workplace, improvements which continued into the dawn of our EU membership.

EUCourtroom

Since 1991, amongst the good decisions and the questionable, we can thank the EU for implementing the following gems that have changed our workplace (hopefully for the better)

• Minimum paid annual leave (now 28 days a year including bank holidays)

• Additional rights for agency and temporary workers and for part-time workers

• Current pregnancy and maternity leave rights

• Parental leave

• Working time (which includes a maximum of a 48-hour week unless you agree otherwise, and minimum rest breaks each day)

• Equal pay

• Anti-discrimination rules on race, sex, disability, age and sexual orientation

• Data protection rights

It doesn’t stop there. There are also employment laws derived from the EU regarding transfers of undertakings (when the business you work for is sold or taken over), collective redundancies, and works councils (giving employees the right to receive information about a business and be consulted about some of its activities).

The UK has traditionally been among the most active opponents of European employment rights, only grudgingly accepting many of the social aspects and only when it has had to. In many cases, such employment rights have been seen by the government to frustrate a flexible workforce and add red-tape to businesses.

In some cases the government has managed to block the introduction of European rights altogether through its vote on the Council of Ministers. But in other cases the European workplace agenda carries on. The government is, for example, presently being forced to adopt a EU directive for additional parental leave – its preferred option is to increase leave to up to 18 weeks a year, which is the minimum implementation of EU requirements.

In 2009 the European court of human rights ruled that workers who are sick during their holiday period can claim back their time, and this was adopted as part of UK law in 2012. And in a separate case the European court said you cannot be discriminated against for your political beliefs (this is not presently covered by existing UK employment law).

However, with Cameron welcoming last week’s European ruling that a policy which banned wearing religious symbols was an infringement of human rights, there are indications that not every employment ruling emanating from Europe is bad. And it is hard to see that the anti-discrimination laws now in force would ever significantly be watered down.

Yet the government does seem intent on eroding employment rights where they are viewed as being bad for business (even if businesses themselves don’t always agree).

Unfair dismissal rights have been watered down, and soon it is likely that workers will face fees for issuing a claim in an employment tribunal. There is also the proposed “employee-owner employment contract” where you give up your employment rights for a share in the business. Most parties were against this idea when consulted, but the government is going ahead nevertheless.

The difficulty with changing existing EU directives is that once adopted they are almost impossible to remove, as repeal requires the consent of the other EU member states. So an exit or renegotiation of terms will be the only way. If this really is on the cards, you may want to make the most of your holiday time and other extended rights courtesy of the EU while you still can. Perhaps a nice trip to Brussels?

Whichever way 2016 pans out for our membership to the EU, one thing is certain, our current recruitment and employment landscape has been indelibly marked by our

 

 

Sources:

http://www.theguardian.com/money/work-blog/2013/jan/24/europe-legacy-uk-workplaces

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Kingdom_labour_law

 

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Recruitment Fraud

Recruitment Fraud

Recruiters make up almost 80% of the vacancy traffic here at My Job Hub. For the unaware, Recruiters, Agencies or Recruitment Consultants as they may be known are used by companies to search and select temporary or permanent staff. They may be retained so that companies use them to find every single new member of staff or they might be used on an ad-hoc basis to cope with growth, peaks in business or to cover staff absence.

A hot topic featured in this weeks BBC Fake Britain was the rare but extremely damaging issue of Recruitment Fraud. Sites like ours are take painstaking effort to vet and manage the thousands of adverts and advertisers each day, that said, it never hurts to know what to look out for.

In 2008 the Metropolitan Police created the Safer Jobs in order to help protect job-seekers, employers and service providers from crime during the process of communicating and fulfilling/acquiring employment opportunities

Below are a few examples of areas to be cautious about an examples of issues raised to Safer Jobs in recent months.

 

04The fake background check
Certain roles that have the responsibility of care or security will naturally require the Candidate to be security vetted. More often than not, this vetting comes in the form of a DBS Check. DBS (Disclosure and Barring Service) is the replacement for the now defunct CRB (Criminal Record Bureau) check. In recent years there has been a rise in recruiters asking for money up-front to undertake a check before any jobs can be applied for and then pocketing the cash and becoming conveniently unavailable when contacted without work ever materialising.

 

03

Travel & subsistence advance
This scam has arisen in roles based overseas or outside the Candidates locality. The “employer” claims that they will require costs covering for relocating the Candidate, for travel, accommodation or insurance. Students have recently been the target of scams for jobs that seem too good to be true offering opportunities, pay and career progression all for a small fee, of course. Often it is claimed that the Recruiter needs to organise the transfers themselves, through their own agent or because they are putting everyone on the same flight/coach and so the Candidate is asked to transfer funds before they can be considered for the role.

02

Premium rate phone numbers
If you are requested to call the recruiter and they don’t seem to have a local rate telephone number, a normal looking mobile number or you can’t find their branch number online, be cautious! It’s a rare one but it has been reported HERE some unscrupulous entities have encouraged job seekers to call their rather expensive numbers without any job opportunity ever materialising.

01

Training
For work in care, industry or other safety critical areas, training is essential. Ideally recruiters will seek Candidates with full certification. More established Recruiters may run regular courses and allow candidates to opt-in and up-skill. Unscrupulous recruiters may use such courses to generate revenue from workers unaware that the qualification holds no value and the training may be incorrect and unverified.

 

The above is just a small snapshot and an absolute minority of the scary bits of finding a job. rest assured that it’s rare and on a site such as ours, you wont get caught up in anything nasty, but it’s always good to know! The team over here at My Job Hub are all a bit experienced in this sort of thing and our advice is this:
Be cautious if you are are asked to pay up front fees. Although checks may be necessary, if money is being sought before you have met with the recruiter, found out about their Client or fully registered your personal details then alarm bells should quite rightly ring. It makes perfect sense that it is better for the
Recruiter to qualify you for a job based on your CV and personal details before they should request money.
Be very cautious if you are asked to pay fees by e-money. E-money is equivalent to cash and allows scammers easy access to the funds but often makes it very difficult to trace their identity, Western Union, PayPal or electronic payment cards are all classed as “E-money” some more reputable recruiters will even cover any costs and deduct them from your first wage or perhaps in the rarest of occasions, (since it’s of benefit to them and their client) cover the cost for you. Asking to be paid via anonymous payment routes and non provision of bank details should always raise concerns.
Beware of fast-track starts. Certain jobs may, quite rightly, be able to start very quickly. Trades like Care, Engineering or Construction have very standardised practices and so jobs can be started very quickly, not all jobs are the same though! If you seem to land the dream job overnight, exercise caution if it’s unusual that they might hire without an induction, interview or meeting you first.
Vet the Recruiter. Reference checking isn’t one way. A recruiter should want you to work for them and you should also want them to work with you! Check their website. Google the company name and make sure that you’re happy that they have no skeletons in their closet. Add your recruiter on LinkedIn and take time to know them and their other Clients.
Accreditations. Several trade bodies exist in the world of Recruitment APSCO, REC, IOR [Hyperlink all] that exist to raise professional standards and encourage accountability. Recruiters registered with a trade body are more likely to conform legally and ethically.
If it’s too good to be true… Lastly but not leastly is the old adage that if it sounds too good to be true, it may well be! Working from home, higher than typical pay or opportunities given to the vastly under-qualified should all ring alarm bells. Do your homework! If you’re going to be putting in many hours and possibly years with your next employer, honestly, a couple of hours research isn’t so bad.

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